www.dharmabook.ru tibetan OCR


Lesson8

i̅ Examples k. andl. illustrate how the tense of such constructions is alter
changing the stem o[ theverb andtheverb complement.
k. ཁོས་ཁ་ལག་ཟས་ཡོད་མེད་འདྲི་གི་འདུག།
hefoodate is no-is aski̅pres. compl.
(They, he, etc.) are asking whether or not he has eaten.
l. ཁོས་ཁ་ལག་ཟ་གི་ཡོད་མེད་འདྲི་གི་འདུག།
he food eat pres.compl. is no-is ask pres. compl.i̅

(They, he, etc.) are asking whether or not he iseating. i̅ i̅
A bbreviated fo ms are a]so commonly used with actiVe or inVo]untary v
conVey this. For example. ཚེ་ཚེ་ཚེ་ཚེ་ཚེ
ཟ་རྒྱུ་
ཡིན་མིན་ཟེ་མིན་ཟེས་ཡོད་མེད་ཌ་ཟས་མེད་ཟ་གི་ཡོད་མེད་ ̅
m. ཁོས་ཁ་ལག་ཟས་མེད་འདྲི་གི་འདུག།
he food ate no-is ask pres. compl.

(They, he, etc.) are asking whether or not he ate. i̅ i̅ i̅
When ཡིན་མིན་ and ཡོད་མེད་ constructions are used with interrogatives such as
ཅི་, ཇི་, aundi̅ག་ they convey not the idea of "whether or not, " but ratherasimple
interrogative meaning.
n. འདི་གང་ཡིན་མིན་བཤད་མ་སོང་།
this what is isnot said no went compl. i̅ i̅ i̅ i̅

(T hey, he, etc.) didn"t say what this is. (What this is, or what this is not, (th1
ཚེ་ etc.) did not ཚེsay. ཚེ་ o
he where gopres
he where gopres.compl. no-exist who-by even know pres. comp]. neg.
Nobodyknowswhereheisgoing (ornotgoing) .
p. ཞུ་མོ་འདི་ག་ནས་ཉོས་མེད་དྲན་གྱི་མི་འདུག།
hat this where from boughtno-exist remember pres. compl. neg.

() don"t remember where (l) bought the hat from.
q. གང་གིས་ཁོ་ན་བ་ཡིན་མིན་ཁོས་ཨེམ་ཆིར་བཤད་སོང་ང་ང་མ།
what by he sick nom. isisnot heby doctorto saidpast Compl. ?
Did he tell the doctor ཚེwhat made him sick?
r. ཁོ་ལ་དངུལ་གང་ཙམ་བྱུང་ཡོད་མེད་མོས་ཤེས་པ་རེད།
he to money how much got exist no-exist sheby knew past compl
She knew how ཚེmuch money he got.
s. ཁོ་ཚོས་ཁོས་ཉི་མ་ག་ཚོད་ལས་ཀ་བྱས་ཡོད་མོད་ཐོ་རྒྱབ་པ་རེད།
he plby heby days how many work did exist no exist list acted past compl.
They recorded how many days he worked.
t. ཁོ་ཚོ་ག་དུས་ནང་ལ་འགྲོ་གི་ཡོད་མེད་དོ་སྣང་མ་བྱུང་།
he pl. when home to gopres. compl. no-exist notice no got
------ ---------------------

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*