4 ཟེསུསྟོསུསྟོU---སྙི་ོདྦྷྱཾརྞྞཱདྦྷྱཟེ
9.lconstructions with ཐབས་ ("way, means")
ཐབས་ (which was first introducedini̅7 5 6) expressestheideaof"themeanstoi̅do"
or "the way to do" something. It is used withi̅the present (or nonpast) stem of verbs in
the fo]lowing fo matVb. (pres.) + ཐབས་ + existential verb (positive or negative) . For
example, འིགྲོ་ཐབས་ཡོད་པ་མ་རེད་ conveys the idea that "there is no way or means to go."
a. སོན་གསར་པ་མེད་པར་བརྟེན། ཐོན་སྐྱེད་ཡར་རྒྱས་གཏོང་ཐབས་ཡོད་པ་མ་རེད།
Because there are no new seeds, there is no way to improve production.
b. ཁོ་རྒྱ་གར་ནས་འདིར་ཆུ་ཚོད་གཉིས་ནང་འབྱོར་ཐབས་མི་འདུག།
There is no way for him to arriVe here fromlndiaintwohours.
c. ཨེམ་ཆི་ལྷ་ས་ནས་འདིར་ཆུ་ཚོད་གཅིག་ནང་ཕེབས་ཐབས་མེད་སྟབས[
Because there was no way for the doctor to come here fromLhasainaunhour,
ནད་པ་དེ་སྨན་ཁང་ལ་བསྐྱལ་བ་རེད།

(They, he, she, etc.) took the patient to the hospital.
ཐབས་ is a]so commonly usedin negative constructions with the Verb བྲལ་ ("to
sepaate") conVeying the meaning of "no way to do the verbal action."
Vb. (nonpast) + ཐབས་ + བྲལ་བ་རེད་
Vb. (nonpast) + ཐབས་ + དང་ + བྲལ་བ་རེད་
d. ཁོ་བལ་ཡུལ་ནས་འདིར་ཆུ་ཚོད་གཉིས་ནང་འབྱོར་ཐབས་བྲལ་བ་རེད།
There was no way for him to a riVe here from Nepalintwohours.
e. ནད་པ་དེ་སྨན་ཁང་ལ་སྐྱེལ་ཐབས་བྲལ་སྟབ་། ཨེམ་ཆི་ཞིག་སྐད་བཏང་སོང་།
Because there is no way to take the patient to the hospital, (they, he, she, etc.) called
i̅ doctor (to come) . i̅ i̅ i̅ i̅ i̅
ཐབས་ is a]so sometimes usedin conjunction with the verb བྱེད་ ("to do") where it
conVeys the idea of "trying to do." The pattern is. Vb. (nonpast) + ཐབས་ + བྱེད་ + Verbal
complement.
f. ཁོ་ཚོས་གཞུང་གསར་པ་ཞིག་འཛུགས་ཐབས་བྱེད་ཀྱི་ཡོད་པ་རེད།
They are trrying to establish a new government.
g. བོད་པ་མང་པོས་འབྲུག་ཡུལ་ནས་བལ་ཡུལ་བར་དུ་ཡོང་ཐབས་བྱས་པ་རེད།
Many Tibetans tried to come to Nepal from Bhutan.
h. ཁོས་གྲོས་ཐབས་བྱས་ཀྱང་། ཕྲུ་གུ་དང་སྐྱེ་དམན་ཡོད་སྟབས་གྲོས་མ་ཐུབ་པ་རེད།
Even though he tried to escape, because (he) had a wife and children, (he) was unable
to escape.
225


tibetan OCR www.dharmabook.ru
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*