Lesson Ten 259
Unless he goes toi̅Tibet, (he) will not be ableto visit the Io Buddha (the famous
statue in the Iokaung) .
I0.6 The "unless" clause connectiVe ན་ནས་མ་གཏོགས་
One mode of expressing "unless" is by the pattern vb. (past stem) + ན་མ་གཏོགས་ or
ནས་མ་གཏོགས་
a. ཁྱེད་རང་མགྱོགས་པོ་ཕྱིན་ན་མ་གཏོགས་གནམ་གྲུ་ཐོན་གྱི་རེད།
Unless you go quickly, the plane will leave.
The previous མ་ + vb. + ན་ construction could be substituted for this (see b.) .
b. ཁྱེད་རང་མགྱོགས་པོ་མ་ཕྱིན་ན་གནམ་གྲུ་ཐོན་གྱི་རེད།
Un]ess you go quickly, the p]ane will leave.
c. ད་ལྟ་ཁ་ལག་ཟས་ནས་མ་གཏོགས་གྲང་མོ་ཆགས་གི་རེད།
Un]ess (youl) eat the food now, it will become cold.
d. ཁོ་ཚོས་མེ་མདའ་གསར་པ་མང་པོ་བཟོས་ན་མ་གཏོགས་ད་མག་ཕམ་ཉིས་ཡོང་གི་རེད།
Unless they make many new guns, (they) will lose the war.
I0.7 མ་གཏོགས་ as a c]ause connectiVe expressing "except for"
ཚེ་ When མ་གཏོགས་ is used together with the instrumental case and the པ་ཡོད་བ་ཡོད་ and
པ་མེད་བ་མེད་ ("'would haVe") subjunctiVeverbal complements, it conVeys the meaning
"except for V, y would have (or would not have) occurred.'"
a. ཁོས་རོགས་རམ་བྱས་པས་མ་གཏོགཏོགས་ང་ཚོར་དཀའ་ལས་ཆེན་པོ་ཡོང་བ་ཡོད།
Except or the help he gave, we would have had great difficu]ties.
b. གནམ་གྲུའི་ནང་ལ་ཕྱིན་པས་མ་གཏོགས་དེ་རིང་སླེབས་པ་མེད།
Except for going by plane, (l) would not have arrived today.
10.8 "Each" constructionsusing རེ་རེ་་རེ་ or རེ་རེ་ i̅ i̅

̅ Tibetan conveysthe notion of "each" somewhat differently than English. Whereas
English requires that only the object be accompanied by "each, " e.g., " He gave each man
a book, " Tibetan requires that both the direct and indirect object be accompanied by
"each." For example, "He gaVe to each man a book each."
a. ཁོས་མི་རེ་རེར་དེབ་རེ་སྤྲད་པ་རེད།
He gaVe each man a book.
b. ཁང་པ་རེ་རེར་སྒོ་རྟགས་རེ་རེ་ཡོད་པ་རེད།
Each house hasa house number.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


tibetan OCR www.dharmabook.ru
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*