278 - Lesson Eleven
A somewhat strongercausativevoicethanb.wouldbeconveyedby
c. ཁོས་ཨེམ་ཆི་འདི་འདིར་ལམ་སེང་ཡོང་དགོས་པ་བཟོས་པ་རེད།
He did something so that this doctor had to come here at once.
d. གཞུང་གིས་དགོན་པ་ཉམས་གསོ་བྱེད་ཐབ་པ་བྱས་པ་རེད།
The goVernment rnade (did sornething to make) it possible torepair the mVonastery.
e. ཞིང་པ་གསར་པ་ཚོས་ཐོན་སྐྱེད་བརྒྱ་ཆ་བཙུ་འཕར་བ་བྱེད་བཞིན་ཡོད་པ་རེད།
The new faurnlers are acting so that production can increase 10 zo.
f. ང་ཚོས་ཁོང་དབྱིན་སྐད་མགྱོགས་པོ་ཤེས་པ་བྱས་པ་ཡིན།
We made him learn English quickly. (We did things so that he ]earned [came to
know] English quickly.)
l .8 "Let" or "a]low" constructions using the verb འིཇུག་ i̅

A sourceof confusion in reading Tibetan stems from the fact that འིཇུག་ is also
used to conveyi̅the meaning of "let do" or "allow" in grammaticalconstructionsidentical
with the causatiVe ones discussed aboVe. Only context Can differentiate the two.
a. ཁོ་ཚོས་མོ་ལྷ་སར་འགྲོ་རུ་བཙུག་པ་རེད།
TheymadehergotoLhasa. Or, TheyallowedhertogotoLhasa.
b. ཁོ་ཚོས་མོ་ལྷ་སར་འགྲོ་མ་བཙུག་པ་རེད།
They did not a]low her go toLhasa.
c. མོས་ཁྱི་འདི་ཤ་ཟ་དུ་བཙུག་པ་རེད།
i̅She let the dog eat the meat. i̅
While བཙུག་ in c. could be taken to convey "made, "' nornmally it wou]d haVe been written
with an extramodifiersuchas ཨུ་ཚུགས་རྒྱབ་ནས་ ("insist") ifthatwasintendedi
d. མོས་ཨུ་ཚུགས་རྒྱབ་ནས་ཁྱི་འདི་ཤ་ཟ་རུ་བཅུག་པ་རེད།
She made the dog eat the meat.
e. ང་ས་ཁོ་ལ་བཏང་ཡིག་ཞིག་འབྲི་རུ་བཙུག་པ་ཡིན།
Ilet (or made) him write a letter.[ ][ ]
NegatiVe constructions, however, nornmally convey "not allowed"
f. གཞུང་གིས་ད་མག་མི་རྣམས་ལ་མེ་མདའ་རྒྱག་རུ་བཙུག་མ་སོང་།
The government did not al]ow the soldiers to shoot guns.
Il .9 "Allow" constructions using the auxiliaryverb ཆོག་
i̅ ཆོག་ is usedi̅with verbs to convey theidea of "allowing" or "pern itting" theverbal
action toHoccur. With some verbs, i̅both the past and non-past stems can be used, but with
others, only the past stem ispernissible. For examp]e, in examplea. the nonpast tense


tibetan OCR www.dharmabook.ru
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*